Breast Pump Review: Medela vs. Evenflo

This afternoon I am running on empty since getting very little sleep last night. My daughter has caught a virus, doctor tells me nothing more serious than a cold. She has been extremely fussy the past few days, very clingy and giving me very little time to myself. I have been doing everything with her attached to my chest. Have you ever tried wiping yourself with a baby attached to your chest? It’s no easy task.

Exhaustion is setting in but I don’t want to fall back into the bad habit of going days, even weeks without a post. So here goes it, please try not to judge my poor grammar usage. I’m a new mom on the grind.

Here we go…

Since I was pregnant I knew without a doubt in my mind that I wanted to breastfeed. I wanted to do it to bond with my baby, and for all the benefits they say goes hand-in-hand with breastfeeding but if I am being completely honest, the main reason I wanted to breastfeed was to save money. 

As soon as my breastmilk came in, I realized my daughter wouldn’t feed enough to completely relieve the pressure and fullness of my breasts. I was leaking through those breast-pads insanely quickly, I was waking up with the bed soaked underneath me. It didn’t take me too long to realize that pumping was going to be a must. 

Off to Babies R Us we went to choose one out. 

I chose my breast pump based on two things. Number one thing was price. I wasn’t sure if pumping was going to be for me. I had read that a lot of women tried breastfeeding and pumping and it didn’t work for them so I didn’t want to purchase an expensive pump and end up abandoning breastfeeding altogether. 

The second thing I had in mind when purchasing was ease of use. 

I knew there were going to be nights when I got almost no sleep, was groggy and would have engorged breasts and all I would be looking for was quick relief. I didn’t want to have to assemble all these pieces, I didn’t want to fuss with it. I just wanted it to be simple and electric. 

Manual pumps just seemed like added torture, so I nixed the idea of those right away (even though the prices seemed enticing). 

Evenflo Advanced Single Electric Pump

I bought this pump at Babies R Us for $69.99 CAD. 

I had been reading about mommies who had been pumping for hours and only ended up fora few ounces of precious breast milk. I was nervous about my breast milk supply and whether or not I would have enough breast milk to succeed at my goal of breastfeeding throughout the first year of my daughter’s life. 

The pump is extremely easy to put together, and take apart to clean. I love that everything is in a single piece which makes it so easy to walk around with and shift positions without worrying about where the pieces are. 

There is a silicone rubber cover that goes over the nipple cover thingy (I know, super technical terms being used today) which I think is what makes it stand apart from the Medela Swing Single Breast Pump. It just gives the pump more suction. 

Sitting for about half an hour on each breast fills the little bottle the pump comes with every morning. It had me wondering whether or not there was a problem with women’s milk production or just the pump they were using. 

The pump only requires AA batteries or can be plugged in. I use the batteries so I can move around freely, and my couch is annoyingly not by an outlet. To clean it you simply pull the frosted plastic pieces away from the large white and teal piece and everything can be rinsed/cleaned in the sink (aside from the large piece with the battery pack attached. 

Easy peasy, lemon squeezy. 

Medela Swing Single Electric Breast Pump

The Medela Swing Breast Pump can be purchased at a number of locations here in Canada, but it is available at Babies R Us for $199.99 CAD.

So you are probably wondering, ‘Well, if you liked the Evenflo pump so much, why did you even try the Medela?’ Excellent question. Long story short, I have constant baby brain and would forget my first name if you asked it to me and forgot to pack my breast pump when I went to visit my in-laws for two weeks. 

One of my husband’s cousins lent me her pump while I was there so I could get some kind of relief and because I had hoped to go out one or two nights while there with my husband and leaving my daughter without food, even for a few hours, is a recipe for disaster. 

I was thrilled with how easy it was to find someone to lend me a pump. As soon as I got it, I sterilized all the pieces I would be using and once everything was dry, I put all the pieces together and gave it a go. 

First things first, I didn’t see the point in that long tube. After using the Evenflo pump, that piece seemed kind of pointless. Also, I found that after sterilization it was pretty much impossible to get all the condensation out of that tube. I don’t know if that makes any difference in terms of how well the pump works since I was just borrowing the pump I didn’t have all the manuals and information.

I also didn’t like that it felt like a lot of separate pieces. You have the cone that you cover your breast with that connects to the bottle. The top of that cone piece connects to the tube which then connects to the circular control piece. 

Typically my pumping routine at home is first thing in the morning when my breasts are the most engorged. I will feed my daughter who usually drifts back off to sleep, then I will pump the remainder of my breastmilk out. As I mentioned earlier this is typically between 4-6 oz. I then pour the breastmilk from my pumping bottle into my Tommee Tippee Pump and Go Pouches

I LOVE these bags. The tops on them make them perfect to pour into the bottle of your choice without spilling, and they also make it extremely easy to pour breastmilk into without losing a single, precious drop. 

This has been my routine since I bought my Evenflo pump and I have gotten used to it. So you can imagine my surprise when I was using the Medela Swing pump, 45 minutes on one breast and I had barely gotten an ounce out of it. My breast was still engorged slightly and I could see the milk spraying out into the pump, so where in the world was all my darn milk going?

I am sure there will be women out there who say they love the Medela breast pumps and they worked perfectly for them. To those women, I say power to you, and keep at it. I think it is important for each and every woman to do what feels right and is best for them. I am merely hoping that for women starting out with breastfeeding that are unsure, the do opt to try the cheaper Evenflo pump to see how it works before breaking the bank on a Medela. If they don’t like it, it’s only $70 gone as opposed to $200. When you are a parent, every penny should count. 

Anyway, off to pumping.